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Charities Review Council Hires Lynnea Atlas-Ingebretson

Give a big, nonprofity welcome to the Charities Review Council’s new Nonprofit and Outreach Specialist, Lynnea Atlas-Ingebretson! Lynnea’s energetic attitude, vast expertise, and passion for capacity building makes her an ideal fit for the Council’s team—also, it doesn’t hurt that she’s a self-proclaimed “nonprofit geek" (she'll fit right in!).

Get to know Lynnea better in these answers to some of our favorite interview questions:

1. Where are you from?
I was born in Minneapolis and have lived in North Minneapolis all but 7 years of my life.

2. What was your childhood like?
I come from a multi-ethnic family, lived in a multi-ethnic neighborhood, attended a multi-ethnic church, and was educated in multi-ethnic schools. I come from a family of artists, outdoors people, and active citizens.

3. What about the job position “Nonprofit & Outreach Specialist” sparked your interest?
As a multi-ethnic woman from the north-side of Minneapolis I have committed my career to the nonprofit sector as a means of creating equity and justice for all people. Individual philanthropy is an amazing legacy the United States has given the world. I believe our sector is poised to continue to improve and produce even higher quality outcomes with accountability, transparency, and equity. We need to be successful at ending historic gaps. I think this position will allow the organization to further explore these issues and build a stronger business case for the future.

4. You’ve worked in nonprofit sectors in other states, what’s different and unique to Minnesota’s sector?
There is a large cultural difference between Minnesota and Colorado which I was totally unaware of prior to moving to Colorado in 2003. I grew an appreciation for both cultures. In Colorado there is more of an individualist culture, a pioneer spirit (you either make it or you don’t). There are pros and cons, like more freedom to do what you think is best and a lack of social contracts leaving communities to struggle with inflexible systems. Here is my best analogy for how these cultures compare.

In Colorado if you go on a hike you can accidently kill yourself six ways from Sunday and along the way to potential doom there are no pit toilets, no railings next to 1000 ft. drops, and nameless valuable species you could be trampling along the way with no clue (Cryptobiotic soil). All this and you can get right up in the wonder and roll all around.

In Minnesota if you go for a hike you have to work really hard to kill yourself; there are many amenities along the way, many railings and buffer zones to prevent any potential accidents for every 6 ft. drop. At every opportune moment a beautifully constructed stone bench appears so you can experience wonders from afar and be sure not to impact the environment too much. The amazing thing is that in spite the two completely different philosophies the hikes are just as revered and the environmental impact is just as appreciated. There are a lot of great people and work going on in both states, a lot can be gained by sharing.

5. If you could only eat one food forever and ever what would it be?
New Mexican Green Chili (vegetarian video) on everything or alone, YUM!

6. What blogs/magazines/organizations do you read to stay on top of sector trends/pre-trend?
I try to catch hot items before they really hit trend, here is my list of maybe some non-usual suspects: I really appreciate the stories and articles that I am connected to by Pollen via LinkedIn, Harvard Business Review always a news maker, I also have been tracking on IDEO (I have an design and creative idea generation history so it’s been really intriguing).
 
7. What do you see as the nonprofit sector’s biggest opportunity in the next five years?
Getting it “right” with cultural competency and effective utilization of diversity as employers. The tides of age, ability, and ethnicity demographic shifts in the workplace is eminent, we need to get this right to be sustainable.

8. If the Charities Review Council was an animal, what type of animal would it be?
Sheep Dog.

9. What are you most excited to learn about with this new job?
How to provide “return on expectations” for nonprofits and their donors as it relates to standards, practices, and systems change.